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The Diva's Review of Step Up Revolution (2012)

The Diva's Review of 

                         Step Up Revolution

 (2012)

A flash mob in Miami is attempting to score enough You-Tube hits on the Internet to go viral, because the video with the most hits during a given period wins a big prize. As a result, we see elaborate productions with witty choreography, inventive settings, creative costumes and high-energy dancing. (Their closest You-Tube rival is a singing cat!) What the dancers lack in formal training they make up for in youthful exuberance and athleticism.

Things get sticky when a real estate developer unveils plans to tear down their part of the city to make way for a swanky new waterfront hotel. Now our gang wants The Mob to be political, too!

This is the fourth in a series; Channing Tatum was in the first. This time, we see:
  • Kathryn McCormick ("Fame" 2009) as Emily, a young woman new to Miami who quickly falls for our hero. Two problems: 1) she wants to be a ballerina and 2) her father is that awful developer!
  • Ryan Guzman (in his film debut) is Sean, waiter by day and entrepreneur in his spare time. He and his chum Eddie, are the creative brains behind all those flash mobs.
  • Misha Gabriel ("Center Stage: Turn it Up") as Eddie, Sean's best pal "since forever!" He does NOT take it well when Sean starts hanging out with Emily.
  • Peter Gallagher ("Idolmaker") is Mr. Anderson, that evil developer and Emily's father. He can't tell her how to dance, so she can't tell him how to run his business.
You will see all the usual suspects, as many of the faces were both familiar, AND welcome, to the big appreciative audience of tweens. This flashy, cliché-ridden, PG-13 musical, bulging with eye-candy, made them very, very happy. AND it was done with no profanity, sweaty bodies or gunfire. The vehicular mayhem was limited to modified cars that could rear up on their back wheels in time to the beat! You had to be there....

In my opinion, there is a particular thrill watching a flash mob convene. We spot some of the faces, admire how they are disguised and can hardly wait to see the reactions of the people they have come to surprise.

Developed by Francis Doody

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