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Dnice
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posted 08-12-2002 06:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dnice     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I thought this might be of interest, in light of a related thread a while back.

Deesha
******

Chuck D Speaks on Elvis' Legacy
Mon Aug 12, 8:44 AM ET

NEW YORK (AP) - Public Enemy frontman Chuck D derided Elvis Presley on the group's 1989 anthem "Fight The Power," but it turns out his feelings for Presley are a little more complicated than the song suggests.

"As a musicologist — and I consider myself one — there was always a great deal of respect for Elvis, especially during his Sun sessions. As a black people, we all knew that," the rapper said.

"My whole thing was the one-sidedness — like, Elvis' icon status in America made it like nobody else counted. ... My heroes came from someone else. My heroes came before him. My heroes were probably his heroes. As far as Elvis being 'The King,' I couldn't buy that."

Chuck D spoke to Newsday about Presley's legacy for a 25th anniversary story on the singer's death.

On "Fight the Power," he said of Presley, "Elvis was a hero to most/But he never meant (expletive) to me, you see/Straight up racist that sucker was, simple and plain."

As for whether there is a modern-day Elvis, Chuck D points to Eminem ( news - web sites).

"Eminem is the new Elvis because, number one, he had the respect for black music that Elvis had," Chuck D said. "I think he's courteous and sympathetic to black music, and, unfortunately, he's more sympathetic to black music than many black artists themselves."

Public Enemy's new album is "Revolverlution."

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kandyman1028
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posted 08-12-2002 09:25 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for kandyman1028   Click Here to Email kandyman1028     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dnice:
I thought this might be of interest, in light of a related thread a while back.

Deesha
******

Chuck D Speaks on Elvis' Legacy
Mon Aug 12, 8:44 AM ET

NEW YORK (AP) - Public Enemy frontman Chuck D derided Elvis Presley on the group's 1989 anthem "Fight The Power," but it turns out his feelings for Presley are a little more complicated than the song suggests.

"As a musicologist — and I consider myself one — there was always a great deal of respect for Elvis, especially during his Sun sessions. As a black people, we all knew that," the rapper said.



Interesting and enlightening, thanks Deesha.

It's particularly noteworthy when considering the accuracy of one of Dreamer's quotes from almost 5 months ago.
"The unfortunate thing about Chuck D's powerful lyric is that he was probably working off of this "urban legend" himself (he's too great a musicologist to believe it today, at a more mature 41) and only served to confirm the legend for a young audience that simply didn't know better (nor particularly cared to --- the "myth" makes more sense)."

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dreamer
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posted 08-12-2002 10:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for dreamer   Click Here to Email dreamer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by kandyman1028:
It's particularly noteworthy when considering the accuracy of one of Dreamer's quotes from almost 5 months ago.

Thanks for the quote. I really didn't want to get into this again. I knew that Chuck D was no fool and wouldn't want to be saddled with that lyric forever (metaphorically resonant though it still is) without clarifying.

This subject is touched on superbly in an article by the wonderful Renee Graham in this past Sunday's Boston Globe (8/11/02). The piece is called "Suspicious Minds" and sub-headed "Even now, many African-Americans have an ambivalent relationship with Elvis Presley."

She touches on how a few well-known "urban legends" (and certain realities) have affected black viewpoints on Elvis as she examines Elvis' standing among blacks in Memphis on the 25th anniversary of his death. Both the pros and cons are interesting to read.

I guess there'll never be "A Little Less Conversation" on this subject. (To quote Elvis' new "re-mixed" hit.)

Anyone interested in some fabulous feature & opinion writing on pop culture please read Renee Graham's stuff in the Boston Globe. I've been rooting for her for a long time. She's almost always on-point and never predictable. It saddened me when she didn't get the recently-filled plum film critic's job at the paper. Two out-of-towners did, including an EW writer. Graham's film, TV, concert and album reviews are first-rate.

(She would have made a great 3BC gal. She should get a copy of the book to review.)


[This message has been edited by dreamer (edited 08-12-2002).]

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